National Eucharistic Pilgrimage Seton Route to Spend Five Days in Archdiocese

| 05/8/2024

By: Steven Schwankert

The pilgrimage will arrive in Port Chester on May 22, stopping at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Shrine, and many parishes

Seminarians lead a eucharistic procession as it passes Radio City Music Hall in New York City Oct. 11, 2022.
Seminarians lead a eucharistic procession as it passes Radio City Music Hall in New York City Oct. 11, 2022. The procession, which followed Mass at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church and traveled a mile-long route through Midtown Manhattan, concluded at St. Patrick's Cathedral, where New York Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan led Benediction. The liturgical events were affiliated with the Napa Institute's Principled Entrepreneurship Conference taking place in New York City Oct. 11-12. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

This spring, the Eucharist is on the march. As many as 100,000 people are expected to participate in the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage, taking place via four routes around the United States and converging in July at the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis.

One of the routes, the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Route (Seton Route), named for one of Manhattan’s favorite saints, will pass through the Archdiocese of New York May 22-26. The procession will make numerous stops between its starting point in Connecticut and its ending point, when it will go forward into the Diocese of Brooklyn.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) launched the National Eucharistic Revival in June, 2022, to rekindle and reinvigorate faith among Catholics following the Covid pandemic. The National Eucharistic Congress is the culmination of that revival, the 10th such event in U.S. history, and the first in 83 years. The pilgrimage allows Catholics who may not be able to attend the Congress to take part in the Eucharist’s journey as it travels through numerous dioceses toward Indianapolis.

“Sometimes we are not sure what else we can do to live out our faith, outside of Mass and our everyday prayer life. This is a concrete way to be a witness in the world of our faith, of why we have hope, in whom we have hope. For that reason, I encourage all Catholics in our archdiocese to take part in the pilgrimage if they are able to,” said Elizabeth Guevara de Gonzalez, director of the Office of Adult Faith Formation Archdiocese of New York.

Beginning at Saint Mary’s Church in New Haven, Connecticut – the parish where Blessed Michael McGivney founded the Knights of Columbus in 1882 – with an all-night Eucharistic adoration, the Eucharist departs via the Seton Route on May 19, entering the Archdiocese of New York on the evening of May 22 at St. John Bosco parish in Port Chester. There, Auxiliary Bishop Edmund J. Whalen, Vicar for Clergy, will celebrate a bilingual Mass, which will be followed by Eucharistic adoration until 8 a.m. on May 23.

Departing Port Chester at 8 a.m. on May 23, the pilgrimage will make stops at St. Pius X in Scarsdale, Immaculate Heart of Mary in Scarsdale, and Immaculate Conception and Assumption of Our Lady in Tuckahoe, before arriving at St. Joseph’s Seminary in Yonkers, where adoration with Auxiliary Bishop John Bonnici will take place from 7-10 p.m.

Following Mass on the morning of May 24, celebrated by Rector of St. Joseph’s Seminary and Diocese of Brooklyn Auxiliary Bishop James Massa, the pilgrimage moves toward the Bronx, with stops at St. John the Baptist in Yonkers, St. Paul the Apostle in Yonkers, St. Patrick’s Home in the South Bronx, St. Philip Neri on the Grand Concourse, and Christ the King at 141 Marcy Place. The group will pass by Yankee Stadium  before an evening adoration and testimony by pilgrims from 7-8:30 p.m. at Cardinal Hayes High School. This event, led by Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Espaillat, will be bilingual in Spanish and English.

Day Four in the archdiocese, May 25, begins at the St. Frances Cabrini Shrine in Washington Heights, where the Eucharist will remain through Mass and lunch, before moving south and stopping at the Naumburg Bandshell in Central Park near 71st Street, and arriving for the evening at St. Vincent Ferrer on Lexington Avenue, where Auxiliary Bishop Gerardo Colacicco and the Dominicans will lead evening adoration.

On the final day of the Seton Route’s journey through the Archdiocese of New York, the Eucharist will be present at St. Patrick’s Cathedral for Mass celebrated by Cardinal Timothy Dolan at 10:15 a.m. Afterward, it will stop at St. Peter’s Church on Barclay Street and the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Shrine in Lower Manhattan, before heading back up to the Brooklyn Bridge for benediction and hand off to the Diocese of Brooklyn at 4 p.m.

"To recover the centrality of Sunday Mass as God's people are fed with the Bread of Life has to be the resolve of this grand Eucharistic congress," Cardinal Timothy Dolan said during the morning's Mass.

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Father Schmitz offered his wisdom on a number of topics -- especially evangelization and the importance of Eucharist.

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“Never are we closer to God and to each other in His Church than when we gather around the sacred table of the altar to be fed by the bread of Heaven, the Most Holy Eucharist," Cardinal Dolan said.

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Cardinal Timothy Dolan (center right) celebrates Mass for the 125th anniversary of St. Philip Neri in the Bronx, joined by Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Espaillat (right) and Father Daniel O'Reilly (left) current pastor of St. Philip Neri.
Cardinal Timothy Dolan (center right) celebrates Mass for the 125th anniversary of St. Philip Neri in the Bronx, joined by Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Espaillat (right) and Father Daniel O'Reilly (left) current pastor of St. Philip Neri. Photo: Steven Schwankert/The Good Newsroom
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